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Sorry to be such a lax blogger lately!  Life has been frantic, as usual.  I’m still working on balancing the blogs with my columns with homeschooling 5 kids and all of my home duties.  At least it keeps life interesting!

Here are a few ways we’ve learned through life lately…….

1.  We’ve had our first real snow and cold of the winter.  Toria and Alex went out and built an impressive snow fort with blocks made from a 5 gallon bucket.  The walls are about 18 inches high now (it’s got a huge circumference, like igloo sized!) and I think they’re hoping for a huge snowfall and help make more snow.  I personally am not! Perhaps I’ll ask them to figure out its square feet once it’s done.  Tricky, eh?  ;)

2.  The kids all fell in love with a free math site online (I wrote about it here) and they all begged to upgrade to premium memberships, which would have cost a fortune.  I found out that there’s a group rate that’s far cheaper and ended up taking over a group buy that was a monumental amount of work but I was able to get all four of my big kids premium memberships.  Even my teenagers wanted in on it even though it technically goes to 8th grade (it’s a lot like Pokemon and they have fun doing it with their younger siblings).  I figure extra math practice never hurt anybody. They are now spending a ton of time doing math willingly so it was worth it to me!

3.  We went to Sioux Falls yesterday to look for new (to us) winter boots for the kids and to run errands.  We have a zoo membership, so Daryl took the kids to the zoo while I was at an appointment.

4.  Fiona napped in the car on the way home and that always means she won’t fall asleep at bedtime.  She was up until some insane hour (2 a.m. or so!) and Toria took her downstairs and read her dozens of picture books so that Daryl and I could sleep.  Bless her heart, she came down from her bedroom and held out her arms to our bouncy Fiona, and told me “I stay up later anyway, Mom, and you have to get up early.  This way you can get some sleep.”  Sometimes teenagers are pretty awesome!

5.  I suggested to Toria and Anna that they could each self publish a Kindle book for a homeschool project this semester.  It would give them writing experience but also work experience and a skill that they could use well in life to earn extra money.  I gave them the task of researching how to do it and left it completely open as to what sort of book they want to publish.  Anna is really excited and is planning on doing a book of her poems and may illustrate it with some of her poetry.  Toria is thinking of converting a public domain short story into a play.

6.  Toria and her dad volunteered at a haunted house set up as a fundraiser in a nearby city for most of October, every Friday and Saturday with lots of extra days thrown in.  It was an elaborate, impressive set-up in an old high school that is now a community center.  There were three floors of haunted areas and the basement was full of prom zombies.  Daryl played a homicidal principal in one of the offices, and Toria and a friend played dead girls (they would do things like twitch or suddenly turn and look at people as they went by).  They had a blast, and they helped with the clean up and the planning meetings for next year’s event.  Toria made friends, she helped a great organization, and she got some pretty crazy work experience.

7.  I’ve put out the art box again, and it’s been a big hit. The basic premise of the art box is that I keep a box or tray of art supplies that the kids can use to do anything they like.  Its contents change all the time so there are new things to do.  I also keep out a glue gun and the kids (other than Fiona) know how to safely use it.  Jack has made billions of adorable little creations out of odds and ends (he uses everything from little wooden shapes from the thrift store to knobs to broken toy bits).  I have to get some pictures of his creations, because they’re so fun. Toria made sweet little paper stars and multi-media collage projects, among a hundred other creations.  Fiona mostly sticks little foam stickers all over things and cuts everything up with scissors.

8.  We adopted a kitten and named him Boots.  Our other two cats were rescues as adults from a shelter, but this little guy needed a home and I broke down and said yes.  He is a real sweetheart, patient with all of the kids loving on him and playful.  His mother is a Siamese and we were surprised that he didn’t look Siamese at all, so we researched cat genetics and found out that the Siamese traits are recessive so a part-Siamese cat will almost never look Siamese (and will typically be black and white or all black no matter what the other cat looked like).  It was fascinating!  We learned so much and I had no idea about any of it.

Siamese cats have a unique coat pattern. The gradual shading of the extremities is caused by a recessive gene with temperature-sensitive expression. The resulting pattern is essentially a heat-map of the cat’s body…

The albino mutation in Siamese cats results in a defective form of tyrosinase which does not function at normal body temperature. Therefore, dark coloration can only appear in parts of the body that are cooler than the core body temperature. The extremities are always the coolest parts of the body. The face is also cooler because of air passing through the sinuses. The back is warmer than the extremities, being closer to the body core, but it is also exposed. The result is a medium degree of tyrosinase function, resulting in a medium degree of shading

You can read this article (read the comment too!) for more about the genetics and science of Siamese cats.

Wikipedia also has some interesting info like this:

All Siamese kittens, although pure cream or white at birth, develop visible points in the first few months of life in colder parts of their body. By the time a kitten is four weeks old, the points should be sufficiently clearly distinguishable to recognise which colour they are. Siamese cats tend to darken with age, and generally, adult Siamese living in warm climates have lighter coats than those in cool climates.

We will be fostering his Siamese mama for the next week before passing her on to some friends who are coming down for Thanksgiving and will be adopting her.

9.  I’m still involving the kids in as much cooking as possible, hoping they will enter adulthood really knowing well how to cook most foods from scratch.  We were talking last night on the way home from Sioux Falls about a conversation I had with a massage therapist earlier in the day about how she needed to switch her diet on her doctor’s orders and was going grain free.  I told her that soups and salads were good, easy meals sometimes where you didn’t miss grains and she said she couldn’t have soup.  I asked why not, and she said her doctor said it often has added flour.  I forgot that most people don’t make their own soup these days, but this lady is close to retirement age and had never made homemade soup!  I told her how to make an easy broth and she was excited to try it, and then I gave her tips on easy soups to make from there.  I consider cooking an essential homeschooling skill that is so important.  Homemade foods are generally ten times healthier, cheaper and tastier.  I have a Pinterest board of cooking and foraging with kids posts that Daryl has written up.

10. We got this free poster through the mail and I’m putting it up along the basement stairs.  I’m a big fan of sneaky homeschooling with posters.

And the kids have done lots of reading, watching documentaries, playing with friends, painting, photography, computer games, LEGOs, drawing, thrift store shopping, nature crafts, listening to music, blogging, decorating, researching, talking, and son on.

 

History Fest 2014

Another History Fest has come and gone, and it was another magical week for our family.

This is something I posted to my homeschool email list about this year’s event and it sums it up well…

I’m home at last from History Fest today.  Most of the family has been going since Wednesday (and helped set up Tuesday) but I stayed home with Fiona until today (her birthday) because it’s such a long day that starts so early.  We have to leave at 6:45 a.m. before the sun is up.

Every time I go I am just dumbfounded at how amazing it is, and the awesomeness of Jack McGowan and the mass of people who help make it happen.  It’s like we have our own personal Walt Disney, except he’s an Irishman and he does it for free, for the love of kids and because  he’s a bit of a big kid himself.  It’s just INCREDIBLE what he’s created there and what he continues to build and dream and make happen just about every week.

Last year, the EPA or some crazy organization suddenly announced that his History Fest buildings (a saloon, chalet, places like that — wooden structures built to be used for special events like History Fest of Boy Scout events, stuff like that) were on the flood plain because his land is between a fork in two rivers, and that the whole county would lose flood insurance by the government if his buildings weren’t moved.  They gave him something like 90 days to move 5 huge buildings and all of the outbuildings to another part of his property.  Keep in mind that History Fest is a nonprofit thing he does on an old sheep farm that the owner has let him use next to his house for years.  It started as a project he did at a local park because he thought the Mankato kids ought to have something like the Renn Fest to learn about history, and it just grew and grew and grew.  He’s a retired guy who owns a water conditioner business (that’s still big in Mankato), so this is not someone with the means to just move 5 buildings in 90 days.  He’s like 70 years old (though he’s tough and sprite!).  And we did it.  We moved all those damn buildings with help from all sorts of people and a construction crew that volunteered a bunch of it and donated money and Sentenced to Serve workers who did their time there and Jack busting his butt every day up on some ladder or using the backhoe or doing what needed to be done.  I was in one of the buildings today and realized I helped smooth that dirt floor and carry the log sections of floor back in.  That’s a pretty neat feeling.

And the owner of that sheep farm finally officially gave the land to Jack for History Fest and the finished buildings are even better now that they’re moved to their own little village area… and somehow Jack has managed to build even more amazing contraptions and improve even more buildings and do even more great stuff, out of the scary situation of thinking it was impossible last summer and the government was going to shut it down…  It’s done, and even better.

To give you an idea of how magical this place is, down by the river there’s a troll tunnel (marked with a painted sign) that goes all the way under the hill and comes up through a brightly painted grate in another part of the land.  He built a concrete troll tunnel for children to climb through!!!!! And there’s a giant piece of a house with a gas pipeline that goes on fire that the kids get to put out all day with water pumped through a fire hose from the river….. and there’s a trebouchet (sp?) that launches pumpkins into the river…. and he gives pianos to anybody anywhere who wants a piano (we got one last year and I love it)…  and there’s an ENORMOUS sandbox that’s always filled with buried treasures like dragon tears and coins… and so much more.

Daryl plays a gambler in the saloon and teaches kids card tricks and how to play chuck-a-luck (a fun dice game in a spinning cage).  He’s a hoot to watch — he really is great with kids.  But I found out today that Jack built the saloon because this lady Annette came to play the piano for history fest a few years ago and there wasn’t a good building for her to play in.  He asked where he ought to put another piano and she said, “Well, if you had a saloon….” and she said, “So Jack built me a saloon.”  Just like that!  This giant building with a bar and tables and stage and fun props (old time guns, funny signs…).  It’s just so amazing.

And all the people involved are amazing too.  I love being a part of it.  We have sassy trolls who fight children with foam swords and shields (the children always win!), and SCA knights who battle and teach the kids everything authentically, and presidents Lincoln and Jefferson and Roosevelt, and a blacksmith and a 1600′s Scottish camp where they make bread in a real stone oven and wooden stilts and carts everywhere for children to climb on, and horses and goats and sheep, and people teaching you how to spin alpaca and sheep wool and then how to weave it, and gunfights and soldiers and pirates and our fantastic friend Susan Hynes who dresses all in period black with her temperance sign about the evils of alcohol who yells at that awful JD Wyatt (my hubby) and his hooligan children who steal her sign and give her grief.  :)

Tonight was the pot luck for the volunteers and reenactors and there was a guy doing balloon animals for the kids.  He’s one of the reenactors and he did these massive balloon hats and 8 silver swords for Alex plus giant horns for his head, and just dozens of crazy balloon creations for all of these elated children.  And the trolls were still in character, giving me grief for having “a little fishy” (I was carrying Fiona’s balloon goldfish on a pole) and the pirates and settlers and everybody filled the hall and they’re just all such neat people and it’s such a magical thing to be a part of.

Anna was chatting with a friend tonight and said she had such a great day, and she told me afterwards, “It must have sounded like I was on a drug trip!  I was talking about getting so many pictures of the belly dancers and that the pirate captain told terrible puns and taking Fiona to sit with the buffalo and jousting with my brothers.”  LOL  I am just so happy that my kids have been able to grow up being a part of this.  :)   And now I’m off to sleep!  Tomorrow morning we’re heading back for the public day (the weekdays are for school kids — SOTH and HS) and it will be another full day!

I just had to share it with you all though.  I wish I could bring you all and your kids, and that everybody could come experience it.

 

and here’s a blog entry about it
http://magicandmayhem.homeschooljournal.net/2008/10/12/history-fest/

Jack McGowan gave an interview to the local news about why he does History Fest and it sums up his funny spunky personality so well.  You can also see my hubby playing the spoons in the beginning of it!

I am so happy to be a part of this magic, and so glad that this is one way my kids are growing up experiencing history class.  :)

You know we’ve never been the school-at-home types around here, and that certainly extends into spelling.

My own personal philosophy when it comes to spelling, after having helped four kids learn to read and then master spelling, is this:

Although reading and spelling seem to go hand in hand, most children fully grasp reading long before they’re spelling well. This is normal, and is not in any way an indication that your child will be a poor speller later on.

You can both suffer through spelling programs and curricula, but it’s not necessarily something your child needs. It’s quite likely that your child will get good at spelling at about the same age whether you use those programs or not.

(You can read the rest of the article here: 12 Ways to improve your child’s spelling)

With all of the kids, I have noticed that they learn to read well and then it is still a couple of years (minimum) before they are naturally spelling well.

With my teens, I also noted that they eventually became very good spellers with very little assistance from me — as long as I was willing to be patient (and a little bit creative in working it into life).

In the elementary years, spelling was the only subject Victoria ever scored at grade level in.  She scored far above grade level in every other subject — even math, which she claimed she hated.  And even then, she only scored at  grade level one year.  That year, we did this a couple of times and by the next year she was above grade level again.

We also do a lot of this silliness, both online (and in emails) and in homeschool journals.  It’s always worked like a charm.

And then we do random spelling, such as calling out words for the kids to spell on car rides.

Right now, we’re working on spelling with Jack.  Spelling was his only grade level subject in his last standardized test (Minnesota requires them annually, though only we see the results).  So September is spelling month.  We’ll continue on into October if he still seems to need it and is enjoying it.  If he’s tired of it by then, I’ll just deploy sneakier methods.  ;)

We’re already having him play some spelling games online and trying out some spelling apps on the iPad, and I’m narrating spelling words for him to spell the same way we did with Victoria.  And I’m encouraging lots more writing (wish lists, stories, anything that comes up).  He’s already improving by leaps and bounds.

I am so glad that I haven’t been tied to daily spelling work with four kids for all of these years!  I find this so much easier for all of us.

I’m still looking for the lazy homeschooler’s answer to all those laundry piles, though.

 

For more on the subject, see….

20 Fun ways to practice spelling words

Dozens of free spelling games online!

 

I’m working on plans right now.  Not in the typical homeschool mama scheduling sort of way, but as a sort of crisis management plan.

My issues are:

  • This summer, I was diagnosed with another autoimmune disease and some problems with my brain (nothing fatal, but apparently some form of epilepsy that is happening quite often each day).  I was also diagnosed with some issues with my blood and stomach, and some deficiencies, but those are the two biggies.
  • I need to find a new balance for homeschooling and properly parenting five children.
  • I need to find a balance for writing four columns that I rely on increasingly more to pay the bills.
  • I need to get my house in some sort of working order.  I have never been much of a housekeeper but when I am sick or overextended I get messier, and this summer was a whole lot of both of those.
  • I desperately want to get my book (A Magical Childhood) finished and published, in one form or another.  I know it’s not the best timing but it never has been and I don’t want to die someday with it 90% finished on my computer somewhere, having spent my whole life putting it off until that “right time.”
  • We had planned to move Victoria to the attic and move Anna into her room and Jack into Anna’s room, since Victoria was going off to art school.  She’s back home but all the kids want to move things around anyway and it was half done, so we’re working really hard to finish all that relocating.  That means major work right now in clearing the rest of the attic, getting it painted and prepped, getting other rooms painted and prepped and on and on.
  • It is fall, and that means a whole lot of work around here.  In-town homesteading is part of how we get by on next to nothing, and that means some major effort in the harvest season.  It doesn’t matter if my brain is short circuiting and Fiona is hanging onto my skirt when my kitchen is full of 4 bushels of free apples, 2 bushels of wild pears and a basket of acorns all needing to be processed and my garden is exploding with stuff to harvest, freeze, dry, dig and pluck.  That’s not even getting into the elderberries to turn into flu-fighting syrup and the others that need to be picked at the county park and the walnuts and the grapes and the plums and the pumpkins….

I have been feeling overwhelmed and overextended.  Truth be told, I have also been having a little bit of a pity party for myself.  I wish that I had more friends nearby.  I wish that I had help with the kids or the house or something, outside of Daryl and the kids themselves.  I wish I had any family alive, other than some long-lost (wonderful) cousins and a grandma and aunt in Ohio.  I wish I had a tribe.

I wish I had a girlfriend who’d come over and drink wine with me.

I had paid to have someone come and help with the house and that didn’t work out.  That person isn’t in a place to help me right now, and I need to just accept that and save myself instead.

So September is my month to save myself, migraines and seizures and clingy toddlers and messy house and all.

September is my month to get back in a homeschool schedule, to knock out that fall work, to take baby steps when I need to and monster steps when I can.

My goal is just to breathe, push, breathe, push, just like having a baby.  Sometimes you just need to keep on going, cuz it’s not going to get better until you get it done.  :)

Wish me luck!

Homeschooling Five Again

August 8

I have five kids at home again.

Victoria’s foray into the world of public schooling didn’t last long.  While P*rpich is a great school, it was not a good fit at all for my nontraditional girl or what we wanted for her.

Among the reasons:

  • There was no Wi-Fi in the dorms and cell service was iffy, so she was quite cut off from outside friends and family.  While Victoria travels away from home a lot, we always stay in touch and do lots of chatting and such, plus she uses the net to stay in contact with many of her friends and to keep up with what’s going on in the world.  She had very limited access to family, friends and the internet.  None of that is ideal for my kid (or me).
  • We were assured that her gluten allergy wouldn’t be an issue (“She’ll just have to pick the foods that don’t have gluten”) but lunch generally consisted of plain lettuce.
  • The days were LONG.  She registered in the spring for her morning (academic) classes and was told that her afternoon (media arts) classes would be assigned.  We knew that the mornings started at 8 a.m. but she found out how long the day was only after she got there.  Every day went from 8 a.m. to 4:15 p.m. — over 8 hours.  From there, she generally needed to head to the computer lab to do homework before it closed.  Once the semester got into full swing, it would have been even longer with the level of projects and homework assigned.  I was quite surprised that the schedule was more rigorous than my college years, for sixteen and seventeen year old kids.
  • While the school specializes in the arts, it is still a very traditional high school.  For a kid who grew up with lots of autonomy and empowerment, this was major culture shock.
  • The kids were really on their own in the dorms.  While there were lots of policies in place to keep them safe and control them (curfews, rules, guards, all meds and supplements had to be locked up with the nurse….), there was very little adult support.  When Victoria had a minor crisis the first night and was trying to figure out how to get some supplies she needed by morning (without a car, a store within walking distance, or family less than 3 hours away), I suggested talking to the “dorm mother.”  I was quite surprised to hear that no adults had introduced themselves to the kids at any point as someone to come to if they needed help or support.  The kids seemed to be essentially on their own.  Since there were testimonials on the web site from parents who said they felt their children were in such great hands, I was really bothered by this, though Victoria took it in stride.
  • Victoria quite simply didn’t enjoy it the way she thought she would.  My kid loves to learn.  She loves photography.  She loves challenges and new experiences.  But it was just not the kind of educational and creative environment she expected.

Ultimately, we drove up and got her before the end of the first week.  She had already made some really wonderful friends that she’ll miss (though they’re keeping in touch online) but she was really happy to come home.  She told me afterwards that she had been sad ahead of time thinking about all of the things she was giving up by going off to P*rpich (travel with us, home, family, freedom, our homeschool adventures…), but she felt that it was going to be worth it because it was going to be such a phenomenal experience.  Then, she said, she got there and realized she was giving all of that up for something that she didn’t even enjoy.

I am not one of those parents who makes my kids finish things they start even when they hate them.  I had one of those parents, and the only thing it ever did for me was give me panic attacks by grade school.

Her childhood is too short to waste a year of it as some kind of life lesson.

I am all for canceling that wedding at the last minute when you know in your heart it’s a mistake, quitting that job that pays well but kills your soul, and having the courage to say “this is not for me” when an opportunity comes along that looks great on paper but is just not a good choice for you.

Victoria has already heard from a boy at the school who wants to go home but his mom doesn’t know how to help him finish his high school years now.  They are looking into online school.  I’m glad that Victoria had an educational life waiting for her back home that she could slip back into — one where she can learn and grow and create in ways that feed her soul.

And that means I want to plan some travel sometime soon……

Free Metals Lapbook!

Hands of a Child is currently offering a free lapbook on metals for grades 4-10.  It’s a huge file full of all sorts of goodies that you can incorporate into your lapbook (or notebook if your kids prefer notebooking).  You can check it out here.

If you’re new to labooking, these articles might help make the first time a success.

Have fun!

I’m loving this middle school science teacher’s blog, The Simply Scientific Classroom, for fun science inspiration.

Among the ideas I’m excited about incorporating in our homeschool this year….

End of Year- Vocabulary Photo Album

“I had purchased photo albums/brag books from a local dollar store. We used the photo albums to store the completed vocabulary cards….”

I’m thinking this could be a great way to do all sorts of subjects, from math cheat sheets to presidents to countries.  :)

Element Superhero

“Students were assigned an element and were instructed to create a superhero based on the element’s properties….”

(Her students just did one each, but I think it would be fun to do a whole set with the kids here.)  :)

Science Notebooking Ideas

“Make notebooking enjoyable for all!  The best way to do this is by using creative activities with notebooking.  Allow the students to get creative as long as they don’t lose focus of their learning target….”

There’s lots more to explore on the site and I subscribed by email, too.  Neat stuff!

 

July is flying past!  We’re so busy, as usual.  Here’s a bit of what homeschool looks like around here lately….

  1. Daryl and the boys just finished the second weekend of the Wilder Pageant. Attendance is averaging between 800 and 1,000 audience members a night.  The performances have been really good and the weather has held out.  Next week is a huge production with many of the cast members from the TV show attending.  Ticket prices are higher, reserved seating has been sold out for months, and we’re anticipating crazy crowds.  It should be fun!
  2. Jack took part in a 6-week day camp at a horse stable with other boys his age. They focused on crafts, woodworking, care of the horses and developing self confidence.  Daryl paid off part of the tuition with volunteer hours, including teaching the boys how to play the spoons and teaching a group of 150 senior citizens about old time musical instruments.
  3. The kids have learned all about the brain from my many medical procedures. Last week I had another EEG, this time after sleep deprivation.  The good news is that my MRI showed no sign of a tumor or stroke.  My neurologist is continuing to look into the cause of  the “sharp waves” and “lightning strikes” that showed up on my EEG and the source of my neurological issues.  Bonus:  I asked for a copy of the MRI on CD so the kids can see pictures of Mama’s brain.  ;)
  4. I printed out these Minecraft math worksheets for the boys. I thought they’d love them since they were Minecraft themed, but after an initial cheer, Jack got a closer look and asked what was Minecraft about them.  I had to admit it was just a graphic on the bottom of each page and neither boy was very impressed.  They did them anyway, but they weren’t pleased!  I have to see if I can figure out how to really make Minecraft math worksheets.  Maybe word problems?
  5. We’ve gone to the family festival in the park at Walnut Grove each Saturday. I love the family festival!  It’s free and full of fun crafts the kids can do, plus lots of demonstrations of old fashioned fun.  There is also lots of great food to buy (go to the Hmong stand! the egg rolls and sesame balls are awesome!), plus there are vendors who sell everything from handmade jewelry to old time bonnets to pottery. 
  6. The three big kids continue to do Khan Academy for math. It’s just an ongoing assignment around here — “Do some math.”  They do the subjects and amount of time they want and I get a report once a week telling me how much they’ve each done and what they’ve learned.  I congratulate whichever kid did the most minutes for the week (it’s almost always Jack).
  7. Anna is writing a book. She’s been writing for a couple of months now and is quite serious about it.  She’s on page 80-something and plans to self-publish it on Kindle.  She has been a writer all of her life but I have never seen her stick to a project for this long.  I’m looking forward to reading the finished book!
  8. The kids have been doing a lot of swimming at the city pool. We got a summer pass and Daryl has taken Victoria, Jack, Alex and Fiona just about every day for an hour or two.  Anna prefers lakes.
  9. I’ve had lots of long conversations with Victoria and Anna. Recent talks with Anna have included the topics of the Gulf War, transgender issues, Iraq, Afghanistan, women’s rights before and after the Taliban, abortion, contraception, medical marijuana, photography, endangered animals, killdeers, toads, college, careers, Facebook, personality types, Edgar Allen Poe and lots more.  Recent conversations with Victoria have included the topics of finances, relationships, Borderline Personality Disorder, #IamJada, naturally healing sinus infections and UTIs,  single-celled organisms, LGBTQA issues and oodles more.
  10. We’ve been raising a baby praying mantis from birth! He/she is currently about 3 weeks old and about 3/4 of an inch long.  Praying Mantis (PM) lives in an antique mason jar with a paper towel and rubber band lid, with an assortment of fruit on the bottom of the habitat.  Every day or so, I tap the top enough to get PM to scoot off the top and then I remove the paper towel for a few minutes while we all watch carefully (we do not want a wild praying mantis living in our kitchen) and lure in some innocent fruit flies that are menacing my counter.  PM is speedy fast at catching them!  We’ll release our pet at some point into the garden, but it’s been a lot of fun to watch him/her grow.

Life is also full of gardening, sleepovers, park days, sprinklers, sandboxes, picture books, chapter books, photography, poetry, video chats, art, play dough, hair experiments (Toria is currently bleach blonde and awaiting a new crazy color and Anna asked me to chop most of her hair off into a bob that looks adorable on her), bike rides, homemade contraptions, berry picking, LEGOs, Minecraft, beading, nature documentaries and the usual mayhem.

Lots of that mayhem!  But it’s all good.  Wine helps.  :)

Anna’s Photography

Toria has been our resident photographer for a few years now and she’s starting art school in the fall to specialize in it, but she has some competition in the family.

Anna has become quite a photographer herself.

Check out her Flickr page here.  She’d love it if you followed her, too, if you’re a photography fan yourself.

I have a Pinterest board just for things I want to do soon, but my list keeps growing.  I’m logging ten homeschool-related ones here so I don’t forget them.

  1. Go hiking at night with flashlights.
  2. Take part in Maker Camp, and at least one of the virtual field trips (Blue Man Group! Jim Henson’s Creature Shop!) too.
  3. Gather mulberries.
  4. Do some new lapbooks.
  5. Take part in education.com’s DIY summer camp with the littles.
  6. Do daily messy art or science.
  7. Keep having Jack do daily pages of writing his story for handwriting/spelling practice.
  8. Do this math art project with the younger kids.
  9. Do lots of algebra and geometry with Victoria to make sure she’s “up to code” before starting Perpich in August, and involve the other kids too.
  10. Standardized tests (per MN law), via the CAT.

I’m due for an MRI next week since my neurologist said my EEG results showed some abnormalities in my brain, specifically “lightning strikes” and “sharp waves.”  I’m hoping it goes as well as possible (IV’s are not my friends and the bruises are just now finally gone from all the blown veins from last month’s IV Venofer treatments) and that I get some answers about my headaches, vision problems and neurological issues.  And I’m hoping to get a copy to show the kids.  You know how homeschoolers turn everything into a teachable moment.  ;)

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